..on educating girls

DSC_0240When you educate a girl, you educate a nation.

When you give opportunities to a girl to evolve to something higher than her current state, she inevitably raises everyone around her to that new standard.

Her man or any potential male out there wanting her attention has to raise their standard to meet hers.Same for other women in her life, be it girlfriends, aunties, mothers. And when she has her own family she raises them up to the standard she has been exposed to. She has become a role model.

Change happens just like that – one female at a time and when more women get an education, it totally lifts up our game.

If you have a daughter,niece, granddaughter – champion her education and personal development. Your investment will not be wasted.

Advertisements

We Need Champions

MEGHAN GRAD14_sml

Paradise High School Graduates 2014

We need champions and role models in our society today.

Most of us are first generation since PNG gained independence. We are the leading edge of change. We are the cutting edge in our journey from Stone Age to colonialism to independence to integration into this post-modern era. The future generation depends on our example. What examples are we setting?

It is easy to go with the flow, to stick with the familiar because the familiar is easy and requires no effort to maintain. Mediocrity requires no sacrifice.

Growing beyond the familiar takes hard work. The mental and emotional effort is as taxing as physical labour. Effort that makes you question yourself to reveal the authentic you; effort that makes you push back the doubts that you may fail and to embrace the chance that you may just make it.

Growing beyond the normal requires you to turn up when all you want to do is go back to sleep.  Growing means believing in the possibility of your dream, when other disbelieve you. It takes guts to push against the world to make space for your dream.

You fail but you keep striving because you know who you are and you believe in your dream and you know that only you can make that dream come alive. It is a lonely road, but, such is the price for the beauty of your dreams.

The world is looking for champions. Champions that keep breaking the glass ceiling of mediocrity to reach for the stars that beckon whoever wants to go for that wild ride. After all, your destiny is what you make it.

The future is watching. Their possibilities are tied to our destinies. We stood on shoulders of champions, the future need us to lift them up to see possibilities beyond our destinies.  Can we lift them any higher than ourselves?

 

 

Tourism and conservation makes sense

DORT Sat_2008 (31).JPGEarly in 2017, The National Geography  Travel listed Papua New Guinea as one of  the top 5 cultural destinations to visit. Papua New Guinea was described as the Garden of Eden, where time has forgotten, where people live like they have lived for centuries.

The PNG culture was depicted as one that still maintains an authentic link to nature, to earth, to life, to the “mama graun”,  with a spirituality that is pure, unswayed by the panoply of civilization. This culture evokes images of awe and wonder and respect.

And to the Papua New Guineans on Facebook, there was a general feeling of pride all around at the announcement. But do we need permission from the National Geography to feel  pride for culture?

Colonialism had a name for our culture – Cane hacker aka kanaka, primitive, less-advanced –  name tags with negative connotations has been carried forward into independence and even at 41 years on.

Even religion that came from America and Germany called it paganism, heathenism, a source of evil and made people sever the link to earth to their “mama graun”. Religion has forgotten that inspiration for religion also has its beginnings in nature.

For the last 100 years, culture has been a source of shame and fear. The brain washing is so deep that even the 21st century parliament of Papua New Guinea vandalized its cultural heritage at the Parliament House and called it an act of cleansing.

But all along, our culture has been our our identify. It is who we are. It is what makes us unique. It is our pride and the heritage we should be passing down to our children.

When we begin to understand more of the world around us, we begin to realize that we are like square  pegs trying to fit into round holes. In our anxiety to fit into the box  given to us by special interests groups, we have been suppressing and denying our identity.

With or without permission from National Geography, we should know that what we have is what the world is looking for.

The world may have achieved mind-defying technological feats, but in the process they have lost the original design of man.  Men was part of nature with a spirit connection. Men lived off nature. Men got inspired by nature. Men revered nature, respected nature and worshiped nature as the source of life. Man had responsibility to protect nature.

The more complex a society becomes, the more averse they are to dirt, to ground, to  earth, to soil. Just look at the jungles of concrete, steel and glass in places where giant trees, grasslands and forests once stood.

But man is spirit and the spirit of our “mama graun communicates via bare skin connected to dirt, to earth.  This makes existing indigenous cultures – the earthy cultures such as ours, an existing conduit for re-connection to nature. A pathway for revitalizing the spirit aspect of a human life.

Earthy cultures offers an opportunity for people to reconnect to the original design of men. These are places one can get away from the hectic hustle and bustle of the 21st century; it is a a place for rest and connection to earth. Walk bare feet on dirt and  feel the heartbeat of “mama graun”. People are looking for the peace, opportunities to reconnect and they re paying to do it.

Tourism and cultural conservation therefore, is the way to go for Papua New Guinea.  Cultural conservation also requires nature conservation.

But firstly, we must be enlightened enough to know where to draw the line. The line between putting on a show for money and being authentic to sharing the embrace of mother earth.

Free Education: an analogy

IMG_0833

Walk for Life participants at the Freeway

On the 15 of May, I took part in the  NCD Walk for Life. The walk every Saturday morning, is an initiative by  the NCD Governor to promote healthy living in the city. During the walk, the Governor also talks with his constituents. The walk normally starts at 4:30am from the Jack Pidik Park and ends at Ela Beach at 6:00am.

That morning, the walk was in conjunction with The Leniata Legacy. The Leniata Legacy is a NGO working to  end violence against women in PNG.

I was the volunteer photographer for the Leniata Legacy that morning. Despite being so unfit, I eventually completed the 8km walk.

At the end of the walk,  free buses was provided for people to return to their suburbs.  While waiting, I took a few pictures of people trying  to get a space on the bus.

It was a mad, mad rush to get on the bus. There was no proper procedure to mount the bus, it was indeed survival of the fittest.

DSC_0891

Free Bus for dropoff

The strong and ruthless managed to get seats while the  less aggressive stood at the edges, dejected – most were women and girls.

While majority were squeezing through the door, handful were climbing through the windows. These window climbers were either getting a leg-up from those outside or getting pulled from those already inside.

For every person in the crammed bus, there was five more outside.

Those that were  outside had the option to wait for the return trip or catch a cab or public buses, if they had cash.

Eventually, every body did get home but for those in the bus it was at the expense of loss of personal space, sweaty and sticky bodies and an exotic mixture of body odors.

DSC_0878

Getting a hand from inside

While looking at images of that day,  it dawned on me how the mad scramble for the NCDC buses was so similar to the free education initiative in PNG.

Education is a big and important investment for any country because getting an education and training is how we build leadership for the future.

The free education initiative in PNG came at the back of the introduction of the Outcome Based Education (OBE). OBE had its own problems. Due to citizen campaign, OBE was eventually changed to Standard based Curriculum in 2015.

Since the free education initiative by the O’Neil Government, there has been a mad, mad rush for “free education”.

There was no preparation prior to rolling out the free education initiative hence, the number of teachers, and resources were not adjusted to address the increase in the number of students.

Stories abound of class numbers increasing from 20 to 50 and even 60 such that some students perch on whatever space they can find in the classroom.  Some students resort to sitting on the floor because the two-man desks  are occupied by four people.

Due to lack of space, some students learn under make-shift tents.

The current education system in PNG may seem fair for everyone, but without the necessary resources to cater for the increased numbers of students, only the aggressive are taking advantage of this system.

This environment has introduced a lot of corrupt practices. Because of an increased number of students but without good record systems, parents and guardians are paying bribes to get the names of their students into schools. People are also using tribal connections to push their own students into institution and this is hurting others who have the grades to go through but do not have the money and the connection.

We are setting up our society up for failure  when we  choose quantity over quality of students. Education resources are mostly based in the urban areas, Libraries, access to internet, and information. In this manner,  the rural students are automatically disadvantaged in the race to secure spaces for future education.

Urban students fare no more better than students from rural areas. Improvements in ICT has made technology a big time waster for young people. They are turning out to be a non-thinking generation. What kind of leaders are we breeding for the future?

The solution?  To provide a fair and great free bus service, the governor has to buy more big buses, train more drivers and build more better bus deports. Likewise, for a better future, our leaders must invest in more classrooms and teachers and education resources to satisfactorily train our future leaders and human resources.

IMG_20160515_094025 (1)

A mad scramble with no quality control.

 

%d bloggers like this: